NEWS

Newsweek: Can Blood from Young People Slow Aging? Silicon Valley Has Bet Billions It Will

The idea that aging and illness go hand and hand is, of course, nothing new. What’s new is the newfound confidence of scientists that “aging” can be measured, reverse-engineered and controlled.

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NIA: The Epigenetics of Aging: What the Body’s Hands of Time Tell Us

We’ve all met older adults who seem younger, whose bodies and brains seem decades nimbler than their actual ages, and wondered, “What makes them different?” Despite the wide range of supplements and related products that claim, without scientific evidence, that they can turn back the years, the key to foiling Father Time may lie in the field of epigenetics.

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BYU Radio: The Cutting Edge of Life

Aging is the result of the deterioration of cells. By reprogramming cells to an embryonic state, we can effectively reverse aging affects in human cells. This scientist wants to cure aging, which would eliminate arthritis, osteoporosis, and other diseases that appear later in life. Listen

Exercise restores youthful properties to muscle stem cells of old mice

The researchers also identified a molecular pathway involved in turning back the clock on the cells. Drugs that could manipulate the pathway might be an effective substitute for exercise, they suggest.

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Ask the Expert: Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD on Young Blood, Biomarkers and Aging

A Q&A with Thomas A. Rando, M.D., Ph.D. on Young Blood, Biomarkers, and Aging

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Rejuvenating our cells can make them more prone to cancer

Researcher Thomas Rando, from Stanford University, talks about efforts to increase the number of healthy years we live.

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Clearing clumps of protein in aging neural stem cells boosts their activity

Young, resting neural stem cells have large protein clumps often associated with neurodegeneration. As stem cells age, the aggregates inhibit their ability to make new neurons, Stanford researchers say.

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Protein helps old blood age the brains of young mice

Old blood can prematurely age the brains of young mice, and scientists may now be closer to understanding how. A protein located in the cells that form a barrier between the brain and blood could be partly to blame, experiments on mice suggest.

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