NEWS

Four faculty members appointed to endowed professorships

Timothy Cornell, Kevin Shea, Joanna Wysocka and Tony Wyss-Coray have been appointed to endowed professorships.

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Honeybee protein keeps stem cells youthful

An active protein component of royal jelly helps honeybees create new queens. Stanford researchers have identified a similar protein in mammals, which keeps cultured embryonic stem cells pluripotent.

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$9.6 million grant to fund research on vascular risk factors for brain aging, dementia

The Stanford project, led by neuroscientists Tony Wyss-Coray and Marion Buckwalter, will focus on the influence of immune factors and systemic inflammation on the brain.

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Time Magazine’s 50 Most Influential People in Health Care

Tony Wyss-Coray, from Stanford University, found that stitching together young and old mice to join their blood systems improved the older mice’s cognition. Startups began offering unproven “fountain of youth” blood-­plasma infusions, but Wyss-­Coray co-founded a company, Alkahest, to scientifically test the idea in people with early Alzheimer’s. Encouraged by early results, he now hopes to refine a blood-plasma treatment for aging brains.

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Eight scientists awarded NIH grants for high-risk, high-reward research

The Stanford scientists will receive $32 million over five years to fund explorations of cancer, the brain, the aging process, chromosomes and the development of cells.

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Ask the Expert: Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD on Young Blood, Biomarkers and Aging

A Q&A with Thomas A. Rando, M.D., Ph.D. on Young Blood, Biomarkers, and Aging

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Rejuvenating our cells can make them more prone to cancer

Researcher Thomas Rando, from Stanford University, talks about efforts to increase the number of healthy years we live.

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Clearing clumps of protein in aging neural stem cells boosts their activity

Young, resting neural stem cells have large protein clumps often associated with neurodegeneration. As stem cells age, the aggregates inhibit their ability to make new neurons, Stanford researchers say.

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Protein helps old blood age the brains of young mice

Old blood can prematurely age the brains of young mice, and scientists may now be closer to understanding how. A protein located in the cells that form a barrier between the brain and blood could be partly to blame, experiments on mice suggest.

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